Community Service: Get Involved as a Family!

Posted on by marney

As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, EC3 relies on our wonderful parent volunteers for many functions – to aid in the governance of the center by serving on the Board of Directors, by pitching in with routine yard maintenance (saving EC3 the cost of outsourcing), or by donating their time and expertise educating children in class and on field trips about special topics, such as oral hygiene or aviation!

Beyond EC3, there are many wonderful opportunities for families to volunteer in the community. I know, I know; between work, school, kids, and countless other activities, the thought of adding another thing to the calendar might sound impossible. But what if that one thing could bring your family closer together, enhance your child’s psychological, social, and intellectual development, AND make everyone feel great?

Check out this great excerpt from an article on KidsHealth.org about the benefits of volunteering. In the coming months, keep an eye out for opportunities for EC3 families to volunteer in the community as a team or individually. And of course everyone is welcome to lend a hand at EC3 anytime!

Reasons to Get Involved

Why should your family lend a helping hand?

  • It feels good. The satisfaction and pride that come from helping others are important reasons to volunteer. When you commit your time and effort to an organization or a cause you feel strongly about, the feeling of fulfillment can be endless.
  • It strengthens your community. Organizations and agencies that use volunteers are providing important services at low or no cost to those who need them. When a community is doing well as a whole, its individuals are better off, too.
  • It can strengthen your family. Volunteerism is a great way for families to have fun and feel closer. But many people say they don’t have the time to volunteer after fulfilling work and family commitments. If that’s the case, try rethinking some of your free time as a family. You could select just one or two projects a year and make them a family tradition (for example, making and donating gift baskets to care facilities for the elderly around the holidays).

What Kids Can Learn From Volunteering

If volunteering begins at an early age, it can become part of kids’ lives — something they might just expect and want to do.

It can teach them:

  • A sense of responsibility. By volunteering, kids and teens learn what it means to make and keep a commitment. They learn how to be on time for a job, do their best, and be proud of the results. But they also learn that, ultimately, we’re all responsible for the well-being of our communities.
  • That one person can make a difference. A wonderful, empowering message for kids is that they’re important enough to have an impact on someone or something else.
  • The benefit of sacrifice. By giving up a toy to a less fortunate child, a child learns that sometimes it’s good to sacrifice. Cutting back on recreation time to help clean up a beach tells kids that there are important things besides ourselves and our immediate needs.
  • Tolerance. Working in community service can bring kids and teens in touch with people of different backgrounds, abilities, ethnicities, ages, and education and income levels. They’ll learn that even the most diverse individuals can be united by common values.
  • Job skills. Community service can help young people decide on their future careers. Are they interested in the medical field? Hospitals and clinics often have teenage volunteer programs. Do they love politics? Kids can work on the real campaigns of local political candidates. Learning to work as a team member, taking on leadership roles, setting project goals — these are all skills that can be gained by volunteering and will serve kids well in any future career.
  • How to fill idle time wisely. If kids aren’t involved in traditional after-school activities, community service can be a wonderful alternative.

http://kidshealth.org/parent/positive/family/volunteer.html

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